Kirkus Review of My Perfect Imperfections

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I took a chance. I sent My Perfect Imperfections to Kirkus Reviews. Sure, I debated for months whether I should or not. I know they have a high reputation in the literary world,  but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to invest the money into it, especially since they give brutally honest reviews. But, I told myself  that even if I get a bad review, perhaps I could learn something from their critique of the book.

After waiting for couple of months, I finally received an email that the review was ready. I think for the first few moments, I simply stared at my screen, not ready to read what they had to say. I mean My Perfect Imperfections was my baby, and who wants to hear any criticism about their child?

But, I decided to put my big girls’ pants on and click on the link. Completely surprised by the positive review, I don’t even think I shared it with anybody until later that night.

Here’s their review:

In this novel, a young woman with cerebral palsy lives, loves, and thrives.

Confined to a wheelchair and unable to speak without assistance from an electronic device, Lily Cooper accepts being dependent on others for help. Her only friend—her beloved sister, Layna—treats her like an equal, while her well-intentioned parents fight about her care. When Layna dies unexpectedly, Lily sinks into depression (“I have no idea of the purpose of my existence anymore. I question what it is in this world that is still keeping me alive”). But eventually she realizes that she must reimagine her future. What follows is an inspiring glimpse into the active and determined mind of a person who, from the outside, appears to be unresponsive. Lily remains, in fact, painfully aware of other people, from those who speak loudly and slowly as if she can’t understand them to those who call her “retarded” just to hurt her feelings. But the ones who take the time to learn how to communicate with her become charmed by her determination and grace. Lily never lets her disability stop her from pursuing her dreams. She finishes high school, attends college, gets her own apartment, and starts a family. Although there are a couple of structural hiccups (the time shifts in the first act seem unnecessary and cause Lily to introduce herself twice to the reader), Williby (Loving You Hurts So Good, 2016, etc.) successfully balances Lily’s many triumphs with detailed descriptions of the day-to-day hardships of living with cerebral palsy. Lily requires help performing the most basic tasks, and her limited mobility sometimes leaves her stranded in awkward—and potentially dangerous—situations. In one thought-provoking scene, Lily’s parents deliberately seize her communication device to keep her from asking too many questions about a painful subject. But Lily is willing to fight for her independence, especially when she meets Chance Ryker, who watched his father die from ALS and fears meeting the same fate. In one especially lovely scene, he tells Lily, “I love to see you smile because you smile with your eyes.”

An uplifting tale about a woman who voices her desires and transcends her limitations, shedding a revealing and flattering light on the private lives of the disabled.

Link: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/jalpa-williby/my-perfect-imperfections/

Of course, I am extremely excited about this review. Now  I need to figure out what to do with it. How do I use it for marketing? Who do I share the review with? Do average readers even know about Kirkus Reviews?

Until I figure out all this, I will continue to write because it is something that I can control. Hopefully, all these reviews and the awards/recognitions I’ve received for my books will help one day.

In the mean time, happy reading! Here’s the link to My Perfect Imperfections: https://www.amazon.com/My-Perfect-Imperfections-Jalpa-Williby-ebook/dp/B011H491IE

 

About Jalpa Williby

Jalpa Williby was born in India and immigrated to the United States at the tender age of eight. A voracious reader, Williby’s adolescence was marked by a promising academic career. After graduating with a Bachelors of Science from the University of Illinois, Williby went on to earn her Masters Degree in Physical Therapy from Northwestern University. Her passion for helping her patients led her to a specialty in neuroscience, focusing on children and adults with neurological impairments. For the past 20 years, Williby has worked as a Physical Therapist, a career she loves because she gets to make a difference, “One person at a time!” When she is not working, she enjoys reading, writing, and spending time with her husband and her three children. Juggling her time as a wife, a mother, and working fulltime, her love and passion for books never subsided. Some of her favorite books are A Thousand Splendid Suns, The Twilight Series, and The Hunger Games Trilogy. When asked what inspired her to write her debut novel, Chaysing Dreams, Williby answers simply, “Because I have a story to share.”

Posted on May 4, 2016, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Great review. I’m with you. Readers’ Favorites and Kirkus Reviews help stroke our egos, when we get some good ones, but what do we really do with them? I’ve yet to submit to Kirkus Review, but I’m thinking out it. Requesting these reviews are an investment in our books, but do readers really read the Editorial section on our book pages?

    Liked by 1 person

  1. Pingback: What would you do if…? | From guestwriters

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